Tag Archives: livestock

Jackson Stables Trail Ride, Estes, CO

trail ride

Trail rides are a great way to enjoy horseback riding. Especially if you don’t have time, money or facilities to own your own horse. Well kept grounds and large paddocks characterize Jackson Stables. Uniquely located in the YMCA camp complex in Estes Park, CO and right outside Rocky Mountain National Park, it is an ideal spot to begin a trail ride. Confident, well-trained guides pair visitors with well groomed, stout and healthy looking horses. Each with a unique personality and good temperament.

Our guide, Liz, was a friend of my daughter from college, who was working at the stables for the summer. Guests can ride, rain or shine. As a matter of fact, guides are trained to deal with the frequent summer storms. Additionally, horses carry rain slickers for guests. Moreover, several areas are earmarked for waiting out inclement weather. Apparently, the horses are used to such situations. Liz told us that they rarely have a problem during the storms.

My daughter’s ride was Otis, a stunning black and white paint, for the more experienced rider. Not only do horses pick up on nervousness and inexperience but some will also see how much they can get away with. Of course, Otis picked up on her confidence and performed flawlessly.

Likewise, Yak drew Dallas, a slow, deliberate buckskin. His only mischief was grabbing mouthfuls of the tall grass growing alongside the trail.

In contrast, my mount was John. John was in much more of a hurry than anyone else. Apparently, our trail ride interrupted his break. While the first half of the trail was fine, John seemed to sense when I got tired. As a result, he decided to have a little fun with me. Almost before my legs got tired of holding on, seems like his trot became more like a bouncy room. With no padding. After a few trots, John and I came to a compromise and I was able to survive the rest of the ride. I definitely need to ride more often.

For the most part we enjoyed  partial cloud cover and temps in the mid-seventies. The trail through Rocky Mountain National Park winds through pine and aspen groves, past streams and waterfalls and along some spectacular view points.

Although Jackson Stables is located in the YMCA camp, YMCA membership is not necessary to use the facilities. The 2-hour ride is $55 per person. They accept credit cards. Tip the guide with cash.

Jackson Stables, Inc.
YMCA of the Rockies Livery
Allen and Julie Jackson, Owners
PO Box 20549
Estes Park, CO 80511

SUMMER PHONE:
(970) 586-3341,
ext. 1140/1149

WINTER PHONE:
(970) 586-6748
(Nov.1 – March 3)

FAX:
(970) 577-1401

EMAIL:
info@JacksonStables.com

 

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Life Without Refrigeration

Life Without Refrigeration by [Gregersen, Susan]

Could you live off-grid without a refrigerator? Susan Gregersen has for over 30 years. She wrote Life Without Refrigeration to share her experiences and tips for preserving food without benefit of a fridge. She explains how bacterial growth and spoilage occur, and why some foods need to be kept cold.

To start with, several chapters address places to keep food cool –

  • root cellar

  • evaporative cooler

  • snow cave

  • basements and crawl spaces.

She then devotes a chapter to alternative means of preserving food –

With each method of storage or preservation, Ms. Gregersen offers examples of which foods are best suited for that method. I was particularly interested in the dairy and meat suggestions and found some new ideas for dehydrating that I plan to try. Especially cottage cheese and sour cream. Apparently it is possible. As another alternative, she gives information on commercial dried and canned meat, dairy and eggs, and alternatives. Raising meat and dairy animals is also an option.

I have stored food in my unheated workshop for many years with great success. Mostly canned, dehydrated, or dry goods, but also citrus and root veggies, wrapped in newspaper and put in boxes. It is very important to pay attention to signs of spoilage and know what kinds of storage or preservation are safe for the foods you are storing. Also how soon to use them.

Although Susan does not give detailed instructions for the projects offered, they serve as a springboard for ideas to further research.

To sum up, this book is a handy reference guide to all of the above, for the beginner. If you are looking for more advanced storage and preservation methods, such as for meat and dairy, it is a good jumping off point.

I bought Life Without Refrigeration from Amazon, Kindle Version. I did not receive any compensation for this review.

Life Without Refrigeration, by Susan Gregersen(c) 2013   82 pages

Available on Amazon $7.99 paperback, $3.99 Kindle

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Barnyard Kids by Dina Rudick

Barnyard Kids A Family Guide for Raising Animals

Want to help your child get excited about raising critters? Barnyard Kids, A Family Guide for Raising Animals, teaches them how, with lots of pictures, diagrams, and words they’ll understand. Dina Rudick gives simple directions for choosing, housing, feeding, and caring for cows, sheep, goats, chickens and other farm animals.
Each chapter starts with a brief overview of the animal, then gets into the details of what, how and why to feed; the animal’s digestive system and other anatomy; common problems, health care, housing, and behavior. Each chapter concludes with what the animal can contribute to the overall homestead and questions and answers not otherwise addressed. This is followed by “your life with – “, detailing a sample daily, weekly and seasonal chores involved in taking care of your flock or herd.
Barnyard Kids is a great science, FFA, 4H and general resource. It is colorful, entertaining and easy to follow for young children, with enough information to spur older children to further investigation into their preferred animal and project suggestions for housing and care.
Barnyard Kids, by Dina Rudick
(c)2015, published by Quarry Books
http://www.quartoknows.com/books/9781631590719/Barnyard-Kids.html?direct=1
$24.99 flexibound
Thanks to the good folks at Quarto Publishing for providing me with a free review copy of this book. No other compensation was received for this review.

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Triplets!

We are blessed with so many miracles around the homestead.  Our old billy goat died over the winter, but he seems to have done his job before checking out.  The other day we went out to feed and discovered this.

The other good news is that we will be back in fresh milk again.  Momma, Freedom, is our heaviest milker, so fresh yogurt and cheese will be back on the table again soon as well.  Not to mention our luxurious goat milk soaps!

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It’s Raining, It’s Pouring

We are having some crazy rain here on the homestead.  It’s been raining a couple days a week all month.  Mabel the Marvelous Dancing Jersey Milk Cow has been through the fence twice, and is currently on timeout in her corral.  The roof is leaking all over my closet, that’s what I get for a fear of heights.  On the other hand, we have some wonderful green grass coming up all over the place.  Need to fix the fence so we can let the animals out to graze on it.
Princess, the crea, comes to sniff my ears and my tea in the mornings, when the weather is nice enough to sit out in the back yard for a few minutes.

In the sewing room, we’re replenishing the winter wardrobe with jeans, jammies and flannels.  In  the kitchen, we’re trying new recipes for whole wheat cinnamon rolls – yummy – sourdough starter and hamburger buns.  We’ve sold out of oatmeal and castille soap, so it’s into the workshop to make a couple batches for holiday orders.  We also need to finish getting our wood in for the winter.  There’s nothing like a cozy fire in the woodstove to warm your soul on a gray day.

Hope you’re getting set for an enjoyable winter, too!

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