Category Archives: Book Reviews

Jungle Doctor and the Whirlwind

jungle doctor

Jungle Doctor And The Whirlwind – Review

http://christianaudio.com/jungle-doctor-and-the-whirlwind-paul-white

Jungle Doctor and the Whirlwind is a fun read, rather like the tradition of James Herriot and Tom Dooley. The book follows Australian missionary Dr. Paul White on his daily adventures. As a physician to tribal peoples in Tanzania, Africa, navigating mud tracks, surviving violent whirlwind dust storms, and battling a dysentery epidemic are all in a day’s work.

Dr. White passes on biblical principles in his daily practice through fables and story telling. His faithful friend and assistant, Daudi, also serves as his interpreter with the natives. The doctor performs surgery and treats patients in the most primitive conditions. As a result, he faces off against witch doctors and drug lords.

White’s narrative style hooks the reader and rivets him until the final page. Thankfully, there are several more books in the series, so readers can satisfy their need to hear more Jungle Doctor adventures.

I enjoy the way narrator Paul Michael reads with distinct and clear character voices. Yet he is easy to listen to. Of the 29 Jungle Doctor books written by Paul White, Christian Audio has 4 of them in audiobook. Each book runs about 2-3 hours. Priced at $10.98, Jungle Doctor and the Whirlwind is great for family listening, car rides, and storytime. Produced in audiobook form for Christian Audio (c)2012.

Thanks to Christian Audio for providing me with a free review copy of this audiobook. No other compensation was received for this review.

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Humanure Handbook

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The Humanure Handbook, (c)2005 (3rd Edition) by Joseph Jenkins

I tried a homemade composting toilet years ago, but I didn’t have the whole picture of what to do with the “waste”. The Humanure Handbook, (c)2005 (3rd Edition) by Joseph Jenkins, gives concise, complete instructions. It also offers supporting information about sanitary practices, composting times, and materials to use. He highly recommends sawdust.

Mr. Jenkins has been using sawdust toilets for decades. He has researched and collected data on the safety, sanitation, and practicality of sawdust toilets. “The Humanure Handbook” began as his thesis for a Master’s degree in Sustainable Systems. He presents detailed information on pathogens, parasites and other critters present in human waste vs. properly cured compost.

I cannot stand the stench or dust of cat litter, so we have been using feline pine with our new kitty. The odor is pleasant and masks the odor of cat waste better than clay litter. It also lasts much longer. It consists of 100% compressed sawdust pellets, with no chemicals or other additives. The pellets absorb moisture and break back down into sawdust, so I can add it to the compost pile.

I am also looking for options for the trailer. The handy fold up toilet is nice, but the bowl is cracked and I cannot get replacement parts for it. Instead of epoxy sealing it, I am going with a sawdust toilet in there, as the gray/black water tank is only about 10 gallons. I also like the composting toilet because it never gets clogged, which happens quite frequently with the water flush toilet.

If you are investigating off-grid options for toilets, looking for more ways to conserve water, or just plain fascinated with why someone would even consider such an option, check out the Humanure Handbook and website. They have a “pile” of information on the subject!

I did not get any compensation for this review.

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Wild Fermentation

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Wild Fermentation, by Sandor Ellix Katz

I love to preserve my homegrown bounty and I have also wondered how it was done before the advent of water bath and pressure canning in the 1800’s. Certainly people preserved foods long before rubber canning seals were invented. Sandor Katz digs deep into ancient preservation methods – primarily fermenting, and provides answers and most importantly, methods for this nutritious way of preserving.

From sauerkraut to sourdough, beer to yogurt, the history, culture that invented it and method of each type of ferment is explored. Katz supplies many anecdotes, both from his own family history and from the groups he studied to illustrate the fermenting process and even the enjoyment of the finished product. Some methods are complicated at best, but most ferments are surprisingly simple and Katz shares many recipes for fermenting and enjoying veggies, dairy, grains, and of course, beer and wine.

Health benefits of fermented foods are also explained and given new value. Dozens of recipes include: basic brining, sauerkraut, kimchi, miso, yogurt, farmer’s cheese and sourdough starter. Anyone looking for new/old ways to preserve food, while retaining as much of the nutrients as possible and making it more easily digestible, will find this book most informative and entertaining.

published in 2003 by Chelsea Green Publishing
90 recipes
208 pages
$20 www.wildfermentation.com

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Cure Tooth Decay

Product Details

Cure Tooth Decay, by Ramiel Nagel

Dentist Weston A. Price did extensive research on nutritional factors of tooth decay in the 1930’s and 1940’s. Based on his findings, Ramiel Nagel set about healing his 3 year old daughter’s extensive tooth decay and met with great success. In Cure Tooth Decay, Nagel draws upon his family’s experience with the effects of improved nutrition upon their own dental (and physical) health as well as the research of other experts and the experiences of other families.

I have read Dr. Price’s work and appreciate the time and effort that the author has put into interpreting the dietary guidelines for tooth remineralization and stopping decay. I don’t agree with all his conclusions or suggestions, but his findings are interesting. This book helped make it easier for me to incorporate Dr. Price’s diet into my own lifestyle and also gave me new ideas for nutritional healing and reminders – like returning to using the water pik – for dental health.

I highly recommend Cure Tooth Decay to anyone looking for more information on proper nutrition and healthy dietary guidelines. I bought the Kindle version from Amazon.

Published by Create Space for http://www.amazon.com

252 pages

Recipe section

Kindle version $9.97     Paperback $26.97

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Life Without Refrigeration

Life Without Refrigeration by [Gregersen, Susan]

Could you live off-grid without a refrigerator? Susan Gregersen has for over 30 years. She wrote Life Without Refrigeration to share her experiences and tips for preserving food without benefit of a fridge. She explains how bacterial growth and spoilage occur, and why some foods need to be kept cold.

To start with, several chapters address places to keep food cool –

  • root cellar

  • evaporative cooler

  • snow cave

  • basements and crawl spaces.

She then devotes a chapter to alternative means of preserving food –

With each method of storage or preservation, Ms. Gregersen offers examples of which foods are best suited for that method. I was particularly interested in the dairy and meat suggestions and found some new ideas for dehydrating that I plan to try. Especially cottage cheese and sour cream. Apparently it is possible. As another alternative, she gives information on commercial dried and canned meat, dairy and eggs, and alternatives. Raising meat and dairy animals is also an option.

I have stored food in my unheated workshop for many years with great success. Mostly canned, dehydrated, or dry goods, but also citrus and root veggies, wrapped in newspaper and put in boxes. It is very important to pay attention to signs of spoilage and know what kinds of storage or preservation are safe for the foods you are storing. Also how soon to use them.

Although Susan does not give detailed instructions for the projects offered, they serve as a springboard for ideas to further research.

To sum up, this book is a handy reference guide to all of the above, for the beginner. If you are looking for more advanced storage and preservation methods, such as for meat and dairy, it is a good jumping off point.

I bought Life Without Refrigeration from Amazon, Kindle Version. I did not receive any compensation for this review.

Life Without Refrigeration, by Susan Gregersen(c) 2013   82 pages

Available on Amazon $7.99 paperback, $3.99 Kindle

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